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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Benji perhaps you could share some wisdom?
 

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do one of the following:
  1. get provisional, pass CBT, pass theory test, pass standard bike modules 1 & 2, spend two years on a restriction of 33hp - can be done on any sized bike so long as power (including restriction) does not exceed 33hp, move on to desired bike after restriction period.
  2. get provisional, pass CBT, pass Direct Access Scheme and get onto desired bike.
 

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iv been told its not the best of ideas to do ur direct access and jump stright of a 125 to a 600 or summin!
no sure if i have the balls to do that anyway...but some people might!
 

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your only limitation is yourself. you know that if you rip the throttle, your litre bike is going to move some. so it's down to you. you'll either do it, or you won't. you know how a bike works at this point. it's your choice, now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Was talking more about...

A guide on riding a 600...
Throttle control, braking, cornering, warming tyres, looking after it...
Stuff like that!
 

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I'm a fan of the restriction route, but it's not for everyone, you can still get your dream bike, and then just restrict it for the period, with under 6 weeks to go, it feels like waiting for christmas did as a little kid. Ridden unrestricted bikes, they are just so powerful it's a job to get used to coming from such a lightweight friendly bike, supersports bikes are savage enough, and superbikes are just loopy.

As for chosing your first bigger bike, it's difficult, be honest how much can you afford to spend on the bike, and how much have you got to spend on running it. If money is tight and you need to commute, do you really want a snarling thirsty sportsbike? If on the other hand if your bike is purely a very nice (expensive) toy, then buy the bike that makes you think wow whenever you open the garage door. There is such a vast range of bikes out there, just choosing the genre of bike you want is a minefield.

Once the genre is decided, comes the next difficult decision which one, I was fortunate and had a very helpful friend, who got me test rides on things I shouldn't have been able to, thanks buddy you know who you are (just in case you are reading this). Otherwise it's magazine reviews and sitting on them, they will feel a bit odd, as the R125 is a thin bike compared to a full size fuel tank between your thighs. But you will have a very quick idea if it feels right. My Ninja felt right the minute I sat on it, and feels even more right now i'm riding it and fully used to it.

Do you buy new or secondhand, depends on budget and what you want. Main dealer or private seller, again some of it comes down to how much money you have to spend, main dealer gives you a bit more security that it's a straight legitimate bike and have somewhere to go back to should it go bang in the first few miles. Private seller allows more of a bargain but do your homework, check the V5 is a real one, should have a bar code, check the mot, and mot history, what kind of problems has it had, if it's a sportsbike, has it had a hard life as a racer, and just had the fairings put back on to sell. Do a HPI check, for finance issues, is it even theres to sell, remember the V5 is not a statement of ownership.
 

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oh, sorry!

in that case:
  • don't go too quick
  • don't brake in a bend.
 

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Benji's post is actually incredibly sensible and should be what everyone should be thinking anyways, without the need to be told 'don't buy a bike you won't be able to afford to run.' very nice, Sir.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Benji's post is actually incredibly sensible and should be what everyone should be thinking anyways, without the need to be told 'don't buy a bike you won't be able to afford to run.' very nice, Sir.
Which is why my new bike was virtually a one for one swap for my old bike. Such a nice feeling that I own it outright, and that it isn't TOO powerful. I am happy I made a sensible choice.


How about for when you first start riding?

My R125, I felt confident that I could chuck it in to more or less any corner at full throttle and come out just fine.
Heck, I was close enough to getting my knee down with a pillion!
 

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when u first start riding,just get use to it in ur own time really! go up and down a quiet road for an hour and get use to the brakes clutch ect!

and remeber not to show off in front of ur mates!!!
 

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Bear in mind the throttle is no longer a simple 2-position switch anymore.
It's a dimmer, and you have to be gentle with it, there's a lot of power difference between a couple of degrees, compared to the R, and gallons more torque kicking out.

I was always told by my instructor, there's no problem going from a 50cc to a 1200, as long as you respect that throttle. It's very sensitive, and if you don't learn to be smooth and graceful you'll have trouble.
Take it eeeeasy. At 1/2 crack you have as much power as you used to, don't be so eager to belt it just yet!
 

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Interesting thread going here as I have my DAS booked later this month. I appreciate all your words of wisdom and had similar views myself. This was until I made the mistake of going on an insurance comparison site for a few quotes only yesterday.

2009 Kawasaki Z1000 £330
2010 Kawasaki Z750 £249
2010 Yamaha XJ6 N £229

These were all on bikes with less than 8k miles from main dealers priced between £4k and £4.5k

I say mistake as this is where the rules of common sense could get thrown out the window.

The cheapest R6 quote I got was £369

What would you do if you had my predicament?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Interesting thread going here as I have my DAS booked later this month. I appreciate all your words of wisdom and had similar views myself. This was until I made the mistake of going on an insurance comparison site for a few quotes only yesterday.

2009 Kawasaki Z1000 £330
2010 Kawasaki Z750 £249
2010 Yamaha XJ6 N £229

These were all on bikes with less than 8k miles from main dealers priced between £4k and £4.5k

I say mistake as this is where the rules of common sense could get thrown out the window.

The cheapest R6 quote I got was £369

What would you do if you had my predicament?
Be glad you are not paying £750 a year for THIRD PARTY insurance on a 17 year old 400cc?
 

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You have my sympathy Fisher, these quotes are with zero no claims declared. Not sure if they will take my R125 no claims into consideration or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
You have my sympathy Fisher, these quotes are with zero no claims declared. Not sure if they will take my R125 no claims into consideration or not.
If you HAVE a no claims bonus, then YES! they will...

But the killer bit will be that you have no EXPERIENCE on a 'big' bike.
Although, if you do your DAS on a 500cc, then you CAN technically say that you have ridden a big bike ;)

But honestly, I wouldn't be complaining with those quotes.
Will be a bit of a shock, but keep your license and claims clean, and next year it should drop loads.

They are treating you as a 'new' rider though =/
 

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Good luck with your DAS, and buy which ever one makes you smile, for the little extra on the insurance I would get the R6, but I'm a sportsbike fan, not keen on nakeds.
 

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im not usaly a fan of naked bikes but i love the new z1000!
Too much plastic, even over the forks no need, looks like the mutant offspring from a transformer crossed with a parking ticket machine. And don't even mention the optional snake skin seat, there is no need.
 
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