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Discussion Starter #1
You will need:
- An assortment of wet and dry sandpaper. From 100 - 1000 grit. (150, 400, 800, 1000, 1500, 2000)
- Primer
- Colour paint
- a LOT of Laquer
- Washing up liquid
- An area to paint in, that is ventilated, and as dust free as possible.
- Cheap black spray paint
- Rubbing / cutting compound
- some clean rags
- masking tape / paper to mask areas off.
- optional: Tack-Rag



Step 1 (clean the panels)
- Remove panels, (honestly, don't try to paint them on your bike).
- Remove your screen and headlights (if possible), remove stickers, and mask over any areas you do not want painted.
- Clean them, take some warm soapy water and rinse them all off nice a proper. Get all the dirt off, front AND back. Even if you are not planning on painting a particular area, if it is dirty and you touch it, your hands will be dirty and you will be putting dirt on the areas you ARE painting.


Step 2 (prepare your work area)
- Prepare your working area, put a cloth down, cover anything that could get covered in paint particles, ensure the area is well ventilated, create some device for holding panels whilst you paint etc.
- I used a hanging rail + coat hangers in my garage to hang the panels from the cieling, this allowed me to get a better spray since I was using aerosol paint (can works better upright).
- For the nose cone, and rear panels, I put my panels on the ground, on top of clean pieces of cardboard.

Step 4 (Sand off old paint)
- I would suggest doing this away from your painting area, to avoid having dust in your painting area.
- Sand all the old paint of your panels using 150 grit sandpaper. You can do this by hand, or with a belt sander.
- Sand in straight lines, all in the same direction.
- Ensure you get in to all curves and crevices (will need to be done by hand).

Step 5 (repair the panels)
- Ensure that the panels are all smooth, and repaired.
- Repair holes with a fibreglass repair kit.
- Actual broken pieces of plastic can be repaired with ABS cement.
- Fill any dents or scratches with general purpose body filler.
- Sand your panels again with the 150grit sandpaper ensuring repair work is flush, and the hole panel is smooth.

Step 6 (Primer)
- If you want the finish to look it's best, this step is vital.
- Was your panels, well. I suggest washing up liquid as this removes all oily build ups.
- Allow panel to dry.
- Apply a generous coat of primer, all over.
- Then take 400grit sandpaper and sand it smooth.
- Apply several more (thinner) layers of primer.
- The overall primer coat must be very thick, this is what will smooth out the surface of your panels.


Step 7 (level the surface)
- Once dried, rough the primer up using 400 grit sandpaper, by lightly running the paper over the surface by hand.
- 'cloud' the panel with a can of black spray paint. You don't need to PAINT it black, just make it cloudy.
- You are then going to sand all the black off, this will show you where the high and low areas of paint are.
- This step isn't vital, but will enable you to get the surface absolutely smooth.


Step 8 (Paint)
- Wash the panels again, well, with degreaser / washing up liquid.
- Allow panels to dry.
- Apply several THIN layers of paint at a time, so thin the colour barely covers the surface.
- It should take 3 or 4 layers before the paint actually covers the surface.
- Allow the paint to dry between each layer (if you did them thin enough, it should be around 15 minutes per coat).
- if you get any runs, you will need to sand that area down and re-apply paint.
- Continue applying thin layers of paint. You WILL learn the meaning of watching paint dry.
- Once you see complete coverage, add another 3 or so 'insurance' coats. These too should be very very thin.
- The paint WILL look VERY dull, and rough, and won't look the final colour. This is normal!


Step 9 (Clear Coat)
- Wipe your now dry, painted panels, preferably with a tack-rag (which is a special sticky cloth for removing dust particles).
- Apply just like the colour coat. VERY thin layers.
- This should be roughly 6 - 8 layers thick, if not more, as this is the protective layer, and what gives the paint it's shininess.

Step 10 (finishing)
- Once the clear coat is dry, if there are any runs etc. I suggest going over them with 800 grit again, getting everywhere flat.
- Then sand the hole panel with ABSOLUTELY SOAKING 1500 grit.
- Then sand the whole panel with ABSOLUTELY SOAKING 2000 grit paper.
- This will get the entire panel nice and thick. DO NOT sand through the clear coat.
- Now you will need to get the panel shiny again.
- Wipe the panel again.
- Rub the entire panel really well with a rubbing or cutting compound,.
- This will be the most labour intensive part.
- You can use a buffer if you wish, but be careful not to go through the clear coat!
- Finally, finish off by polishing the panel!


Notes and Warnings:
- Make sure you are in a well ventialted area!!!!
- Ensure you read the warnings on the paint, paint applied with a spray gun can be VERY toxic.
- Aerosol paint can be equally dangerous, although not usuall QUITE as lethal...
- Always do thin layers to avoid running, and to speed drying.
- Always allow your layers to dry between coats.
- Always wipe or clean your panels between stages.
- ENSURE you are in a dust free environment.
- Your wet sandpaper, should be soaked through totally, in clean water, with dish washing liquid in. This prevents the sand paper from sticking.
- Be patient.

Alternative Easy method:
- Sand whole panel with 100 grit.
- Clean.
- Spray primer on, quite thickly, but not too thick that it runs. 2 or 3 thick coats should be enough.
- sand with 800 grit.
- clean.
- Paint several THIN layers on. VERY VERY thin. Allow to dry between each coat.
- sand LIGHTLY VERY WET 2000 grit wet and dry. (if you don't have any wet and dry, then you can actually use just regular printer paper soaked in water).
- clean (carefully).
- spray many layers of clear coat. Again VERY thinly. This should be nice and thick.
- Rub down with TCut or rubbing compound.
 

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Seems like alot of hard work and I don't really have an area that's dust free and outside :( but thanks for he guide man. The only I can see is like a list of 'things you require' would be nice rather then sifting through the whole thread. But thanks again man
 

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and not sure how good i would be with abs cement, part of my nose cone is broken :(
 

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yeah wouldnt have a clue about that either, might be easier to buy a new nose
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The ABS cement is actually rather easy, I will be making a guide for that too!

As for the area for painting in, it doesn't HAVE to be outside.
I used my garage, and just had the door open.

When Henal paints, he just uses his garden.

Finally, as for all the hard work and hassle, that is how you get the BEST possible case, professional look finish. You CAN skip parts of it, but the finish just isn't guaranteed to be AS good as the original part.

You can do this easy method:
- Sand whole panel with 100 grit.
- Clean.
- Spray primer on, quite thickly, but not too thick that it runs. 2 or 3 thick coats should be enough.
- sand with 800 grit.
- clean.
- Paint several THIN layers on. VERY VERY thin. Allow to dry between each coat.
- sand LIGHTLY VERY WET 2000 grit wet and dry. (if you don't have any wet and dry, then you can actually use just regular printer paper soaked in water).
- clean (carefully).
- spray many layers of clear coat. Again VERY thinly. This should be nice and thick.
- Rub down with TCut or rubbing compound.
 

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yeah wouldnt have a clue about that either, might be easier to buy a new nose
Thats what i have had to do. I've had to take a chance on an after market mould though as i simply can't afford to buy an original part as they are in the region of £175 brand new. Trying to get one on eBay is murder as they are rare to find, always someone willing to bid higher than you.
 

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there is currently a red nose cone on ebay for £72 plus 10 p&p, but hands off its mine! :p
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I promise you, I was in this exact position myself.
Repairing and painting us MUCH MUCH cheaper / easier!!!

The majority of panels you buy, aren't even perfect condition. Most are scratched, or badly painted.
Can YOU think of a reason to sell a perfectly good panel?

Honestly, painting isn't that difficult!
I can help you if you like, I am no expert, but I am okay at it!
 

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Painting best option. Ull never be able get 100% factory finish look unless you have a booth n a compresor. Whatever you do don't painr where there is dust, it will stick to your fresh paint like god knows what. The finish depends on the prep and dedication to the job spray sand spray sand to get all of the imperfections out. I did body work at col believe me it can be a ball ache but the end result is satisfying. Really good guide this cam BTW help alot of peoplr cause they'll be more scuffs before end of winter
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Painting best option. Ull never be able get 100% factory finish look unless you have a booth n a compresor. Whatever you do don't painr where there is dust, it will stick to your fresh paint like god knows what. The finish depends on the prep and dedication to the job spray sand spray sand to get all of the imperfections out. I did body work at col believe me it can be a ball ache but the end result is satisfying. Really good guide this cam BTW help alot of peoplr cause they'll be more scuffs before end of winter
All look correct to you?
I wasn't 100% sure on which grits to use at each stage, but from memory this sounds about right to me :S
 

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80 seems a little harsh tbh. only need a fine grit to take back a layer or 2 of paint to get surface fine for priming. to low youll put huge gauge marks in the plastic. other than that its an awesome guide cant fault it one bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
80 seems a little harsh tbh. only need a fine grit to take back a layer or 2 of paint to get surface fine for priming. to low youll put huge gauge marks in the plastic. other than that its an awesome guide cant fault it one bit.
Changed to 150 grit :)
 

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I've just got my nose cone through the door today. Made my way through the first sanding stage. Just need to wait till i get paid tomorrow to buy the primer and paint. Does anyone know roughly how much paint and primer i will need? I was going to get one can of each aerosol 400ml. Will this be enough to do the nose cone do you think?
 
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