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Discussion Starter #1
I just broke yet another sump plug.
I have rounded this one completely!

Damn things are made so soft! They just crumble away :(

SO I have now ordered a new Titanium one from Rtuna.
It is a track use one, so I suspect it should do the trick...
Should at least be a bit stronger! :)

Also, it has a magnet inside, which makes any metal fragments in the oil stick to it, and therefore removes them from circulating around the engine which is nice :)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Oh, and now I have no idea how to remove it...
Sensibly that is.
 

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Weld an old spanner to it? Or grind it smaller to sit a spanner to it?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hmmm... that is a GENIUS idea.
Although the whole thing is pretty chipped, as in big chunks of it are missing :S
 

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How? Poor quality tools? or sheer hamfistedness?

Punch the outside and gently tap it round with a hammer and punch. How tight are you doing them up? Are you doing them up with the engine still warm? If so the whole in the sump is slightly larger, you can then tighten the sump plug tighter easier, once it cools, it's really very tight.
 

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How? Poor quality tools? or sheer hamfistedness?

Punch the outside and gently tap it round with a hammer and punch. How tight are you doing them up? Are you doing them up with the engine still warm? If so the whole in the sump is slightly larger, you can then tighten the sump plug tighter easier, once it cools, it's really very tight.
I honestly don't know how I managed this to be honest.
I tried being gentle... but it just wont budge!

I don't THINK I am doing it up whilst it is still hot, as by the time I have DONE the oil change, my engine has normally cooled down quite a bit.

I am doing it up hand tight with my socket tool Then maybe another quarter turn...
I don't have a torque wrench.....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So just to let you know, that titanium pro bolt sump plug was listed by mistake for the R125.
I will now have to source an OEM part =/
 

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So just to let you know, that titanium pro bolt sump plug was listed by mistake for the R125.
I will now have to source an OEM part :hmm:
go on probolt site they have them there
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Pro Bolt apparently do not make them for the R125...
 

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Sorry fella, didn't notice this, no it's way too smaller thread size, it's ok for an R6, but the R125 is a very big plug, it has to be due to the strainer.
Is that strainer actually important? What does it do?
I thought that you just forgo the strainer, and then the magnet works better?

Damn shame... I was really looking forward to that part... not made of cheese AND the magnet would of been nice!

I currently hold a magnet under the sump when I remove it, so that I can keep an eye on engine wear to an extent...
 

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Not convinced by magnetic sump bolts, the only place you find them is in some gearboxes on cars. If it was required, it would be there, manufacturers don't want warranty claims.

If you are seeing particles big enough to stick to a magnet, you have issues. How do you know it's not from the gearbox, it's a shared sump. The only true way to check oil condition is chemical analysis, and by knowing what there is in it, and knowing what alloys are in the construction of the engine and gearbox can you tell what is wearing. This is a common practice on large commercial gearboxes, such as the sort found in power stations and cargo ships.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Not convinced by magnetic sump bolts, the only place you find them is in some gearboxes on cars. If it was required, it would be there, manufacturers don't want warranty claims.

If you are seeing particles big enough to stick to a magnet, you have issues. How do you know it's not from the gearbox, it's a shared sump. The only true way to check oil condition is chemical analysis, and by knowing what there is in it, and knowing what alloys are in the construction of the engine and gearbox can you tell what is wearing. This is a common practice on large commercial gearboxes, such as the sort found in power stations and cargo ships.
Engine wear, gearbox wear. Same thing. Or at least, that is what I was reffering to, as I am aware we share the same oil between the two :p

And I don't normally notice particles, I did ONCE, but that was when I first bought the bike.
I more or less just do it as a precaution... If I start seeing particles, then I know that something is up :)
...Hence why I do it.
 

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You would probably be hearing or feeling it first, with so little power, you soon notice any drop off. (this is not a pop at R125's, just an observation).
 

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Removing large particles that can be trapped like that rather than filling the filter. Think of it as a two stage filtration process.
 

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Hmmmm, does it butt up against something with the spring then?
I guess it must do
 

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