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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So here is my attempt at a "How To" guide, terminology may not be correct but I'll try my best, Benji feel free to amend as necessary. Obviously for anyone undertaking this, the workshop manual should remain your main reference manual.

So ..Badger tuning turned up on Saturday morning to fit the kit, I already had removed the fairings (much appreciated).



So, first thing is to remove the petrol tank cover



Bolts are located here and one at the front for removal of the tank



Remove fuel line from tank



Fuel tank can now be removed.



Next, unscrew the air box and remove air filter



Clean inside of air box to remove any oil or water residue (there should be none if you have popped off the clip and the cap at the base of the airbox on a regular basis).



Now remove the exhaust manifold bolts



After removing the remaining bolts the exhaust system can be removed



Remove air tubing and install a set of Benji's finest air bungs....MORE POWER!!! :cool:



Now begin to unclip wiring harnesses from throttle body




Now remove fuel injector from throttle body (optionally the injector will unclip from the loom a few cms up the wiring from the injector)



Throttle body can now be fully removed, ensure all cables have been detached from the engine



Now remove the radiator



Empty contents to disposal vessel (dispose of coolant down a main drain, as it is toxic to animals)



Now remove coolant expansion tank



Now remove chain from front sprocket, loosen rear wheel to ensure enough slack is available.



Now remove all engine mountings, place trolley jack underneath to support engine weight



Now trick unsuspecting 38 year old into carrying engine to a suitable place to be worked upon, support with wooden block to keep engine upright. (Because the youngster looked tired from impersonating a japanese tourist)



Now remove rocker/camshaft cover



Remover water pump, shown with green dot



Reveal cam shaft and cam chain



Turn crankshaft to find timing markers



Line marker on cam sprocket should be between external markers



Line markers should be visible within crank case window



Paint marker to help ensure that correct timing is maintained following cylinder replacement



Remove rubber bung from the camchain tensioner, then wind back the tensioner, then remove tensioner.



Remove chain from sprocket and keep tension to ensure chain remains attached to bottom sprocket, use garden wire to ensure tension remains constant



Now remove cylinder head bolts



Remove cylinder head



Note carbon deposits as a result of using supermarket fuel on piston head



Note cam chain plastic guide rail, and the locating tab that it hangs on.



Insert roll into cylinder to ensure debris does not fall in when removing base gasket or when removing/inserting wrist clip pins.



Remove base gasket (green)..takes ages scraping off with razor's



Use wet and dry paper (600 grit) to smooth the surface to ensure the gasket has a smooth and even surface to seal to correctly (no leaks)



Remove wrist pin from cylinder in order to remove piston head





Remove piston



Note difference in size between 182cc & 125cc cylinder



Note cylinder honing (light scoring), honing basically allows for proper ring seating, as well as oil retention (proper lubrication)



Now ensure proper seating and alignment of piston rings, the ring gaps ideally need to sit at 120 degrees to each other.



Place piston onto conrod, lubricate and insert the wrist pin



Fix wrist pin to attach piston head to piston, order more wrist pin clips than you need, this seems to ward off the evil spirits of pinging small items into the wild blue yonder.



Now place cylinder top on top of piston, ring compressors are required to ensure piston rings stay in required location and are compressed to allow entry into the cylinder. Rings are very fragile, especially oil control rings, lubricate them first and the ring compressor.



Ensure cam chain remains under tension and is fed through cylinder head



Fix cylinder head bolts

Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18 Show Content


Reinsert cam sprocket and attach chain



Reattach cam chain tensioner



Reattach water pump



Replace rocker cover and engine rebuild is complete. Time to locate in chassis and fix engine mounts.



Reinstall radiator and expansion tank. Fill with new coolant, remove the bolt from the front of the cylinder, on filling this will begin to pour, when this happens reinstall bolt, keep filling. Filling is done via the radiator cap, not the expansion bottle.



Reinstall throttle body



Remove pillion seat and install power commander or other module, feed through wiring harness to throttle body



Use PC5 wire tap to connect to the throttle position wire (yellow wire) and clip in control cables



Further photo



Install exhaust, scorpion in this case to match the power commander map. Reattach fuel line but not tank. At this point the power commander should be attached to your laptop and software used to establish connectivity between power commander and bike, and that the wire tap is connected and the throttle position is being seen, move the throttle and you should see the value change. Now FIRE her up. Adjust idle¡Kthis will register on the software and should tally with rev counter. Once satisfied, shut off engine and begin servicing. This is to ensure any issues with the engine running are related only to the malossi kit installed. Firstly, reinstall air filter (only cleaned this time round) and fix tank in place. Remove scorpion for oil change. Check coolant level in radiator once it has cooled down.



Remove sump plug and let oil flow into container vessel



Remove filter and clean housing and insert new filter.



Clean sump plug and strainer and fix.



Refill with 1L of your finest lubricant, fix scorpion exhaust in place



Lastly ensure gear pedal is fixed in correct position so that it does not rub on the fairing.



Replace fairings and THERE YOU HAVE IT..THE R182 :cool:
 

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There you go, all fixed :)
 

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Wow, I love this! I want the 182kit just to take my bike apart tbh!!! =]

Luckily you got the kit run in!!! All we now need is your review on the 182kit and I the info provided will HOPEFULLY clear up a lot jargon on forums rather than people quoting others all the time or stating they heard this and that :) !!!!
 

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I believe, if I remember correctly, then with certain sprockets, you can get the bike to 90mph relatively easily (and hold it).
Although, obviously you CAN gear it for more top end, but at the sacrifice of acceleration, and never realistically being able to REACH the top speed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I believe, if I remember correctly, then with certain sprockets, you can get the bike to 90mph relatively easily (and hold it).
Although, obviously you CAN gear it for more top end, but at the sacrifice of acceleration, and never realistically being able to REACH the top speed.
From what Benji said 90+ is not particularly easy with the 15t front sprocket but achievable, not sure what you would get with any other combinations without losing significant mid range power as you have said.

Currently on the standard gearing which is obviously still topping out at around 80+
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
yeah acceleration is far better and yeah, the front has tried to pop up when i have forgot i'm not riding a standard bike anymore!!:D
 

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Edited to match the copy on R125.co.uk

Wasn't too bad for time, it was a massive help arriving to find the fairings already removed. You could if you want to make it difficult, leave the engine in, but it's so much easier popping it out and working on it on the floor/bench.
 

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Edited to match the copy on R125.co.uk

Wasn't too bad for time, it was a massive help arriving to find the fairings already removed. You could if you want to make it difficult, leave the engine in, but it's so much easier popping it out and working on it on the floor/bench.
exactly what i did, if i was ever to do it again, i would definetly take the engine out lol

has he got the malossi cam too or just the bore kit? if just the bore kit his power starts to drop at around 8.5k rpm and most amout of tourque is around 5.5k rpm so if he wants more top end he'll need to get the cam to move the power band further up the revs where its needed for top end speed plus it adds about 2-3 bhp but im sure you already knew most of that :p i know this because its how my bike runs lol
 

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very cheap mate but tbh thats around how much i would charge if i ever got asked to do it, not a hard job if you know what your doing but just takes alot of time :p
 
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