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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I will add to this as I remember things.

The Mod 2 really isn't as difficult as you might think. That is the first thing to remember.
The examiners (unlike car drivers) are bikers themselves, and they WANT you to pass.

- Ride within the speed limit at all times.
- Pay EXTRA attention, looking out for speed signs and make sure you slow down to the limit BEFORE the sign.
- Speed up AFTER you pass signs.
- Make sure you are going as fast as it is safe to do so. (don't do 30 in a 40 zone for example).
- Make sure you are in the CENTRE of your lane, even on roundabouts.
- The only time you will move across, is when you are turning, or avoiding a hazard.

- ALWAYS scan and look around ahead. JUST like in your hazard perception test. keep looking out for hazards, oncoming bends, signs, etc. This will help you prepare yourself for whatever is coming up.
- React as early as possible. Parked car ahead? Move over nice and early. Get in lane sign? Get in the correct lane as early as possible.

- In residential areas, if the road is narrow, and there are parked cars which you have to ride close to, slow down!
- On roundabouts, never go over 20mph, and always stay in your lane!
- If there are parked cars in your lane, move across so you are more or less on the lines in the middle, but be prepared to move over for oncoming cars. (you will be scanning ahead, and so therefore should be well clear of the cars before they are close to you).
- If you can't see far ahead, then move closer to the parked cars, and slow down.
- Use your common sense. I actually got a minor for being to slow in this situation, (20mph) because I still had lots of room. Use your common sense.

- Traffic lights, stop about a half or a full length away from the car in front.
- One or two lifesavers whenever you pull away from stationary. Depends on the situation, if there is SPACE for a cyclist etc. to your left, then do a left one, and vice versa.
- Whenever you see something, such as a sign, or traffic lights, etc. do a mirror check.
- Whenever you are about to change direction, or speed, do a mirror check.
- Whenever you are about to cross a line, lifesaver.
- When exiting a roundabout, as you are indicating, you are doing a lifesaver. You will know which direction to do the lifesaver, as you should be doing it already, but it's whichever side feels most vulnerable to cars cutting you up.
- When he asks you to pull over to the side, DON'T stop on double yellow lines (apparently).
- Don't stop blocking driveways.
- Generally just be sensible where you stop.
- He will probably at some point also make you stop behind a parked car, he wants to see you edge out carefully around something which is blocking your view of the road.
- When ever you DO pull over, cancel your indicator once you have stopped.
- Obviously, mirror, indicator, lifesaver, pull out.

- If you are ever stopped for long periods of time, such as at level crossings, engine in neutral, and engine off as you are supposed to be economical.
- Don't over rev your engine (same reason as above).
- On dual carriage ways, don't bother overtaking unless the car in front is only doing about 40mph, then you would be expected to (if safe to do so).

*Please feel free to ask any questions, and I will see if I remember my instructor telling me anything about the topic**

I passed by the way.
Only 4 minors, 1 for speed, 1 for stopping on a double yellow lines (I think I panicked trying to find a 'safe' place to stop) and I think I got a couple for my road positioning. I drift to the side of my lane on corners and roundabouts, which I think is just a habit I have picked up.

 

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you got a phone number for these people who trained you? they sound good
 

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Do they mind if you wear trainers? As silly as it sounds I feel more comfortable with controlling the bike with my trainers than I do with my boots.. (Yes, odd, I know!)

Grats btw :)
 

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Depends, my instructor has a letter from the DSA saying CBTs are to be rejected if the rider is not in proper gear.
I doubt they'd be happy you doing Mods in trainers...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I honestly wouldn't risk it.
NOTHING worse than getting turned away.

BESIDES, if the examiner sees you in trainers, they might take an instant prejudice against you.
As opposed to, if you are wearing the proper gear, they will be more likely to think you are a more careful, and mature rider.

If you REALLY want to wear trainers, I would take your boots along in a bag, and simply ask the examiner. If he says no, then you can always change.

http://ex-celerate.co.uk/default.aspx
That is the school I used. Diana is the admin person, and Nikos is the trainer.
You can tell them I sent you, earns me brownie points :p

From the instructors I have seen...
He may not come across as the most friendly, or talkative, but he DOES know what he is talking about.
If he thinks you are good, then you can rest assured that you will pass :)

Generally... you cannot go too far wrong with the instructors in Farnborough, as they all seem pretty nice, and they all know each other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Also...
I have been taking Pillions all day yesterday and today.

Was actually pretty easy to get used to, and I can ride almost as well with them now (once they are used to leaning that is).
I just need a slightly faster bike though!!!

I avoid the dual carriageways as much as I can.
And don't like to leave the town, as I know it will just be embarrasing :p

The bike is pretty quick up to about 50.
Then up to 60 is okay ISH depending on the gradiant...
Then 60 upwards is slow at best.

I am yet to see 70 with a pillion...

Also, braking. GEEEEESH. You can REALLY notice the G-Forces involved in braking with a pillion, as obviously they don't brace themselves automatically like you do as a rider, and they don't have as much to brace with, so they generally end up pushing on you, and you REALLY feel it.

Also, gear changes are a lot less smooth, as obviously the bike carries more momentum.

Cornering is still pretty good. Fairly easy, I just don't know what the limits are with grip with the extra weight, but I have got as low as I dare for now...

I can corner low enough to scare the **** out of most pillions, as they are so high up it feels a lot more exaggerated. I remember when I first rode pillion on my bike (with the previous owner). Just a normal, slow roundabout scared the hell out of me :p
 

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Did you have to notify your insurance of change in licence status or that you are going to carry pillions. I opted not to have cover for passengers but hoping to change that soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Did you have to notify your insurance of change in licence status or that you are going to carry pillions. I opted not to have cover for passengers but hoping to change that soon.
I phoned them as soon as I got home to tell them.
The lisence change had no cost (no admin fee, and no change to the premium).

As for the Pillion, I didn't mention it, and at the same time I was never asked, so....
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
45 minutes.

That includes:

- enter a room with examiner
- hand over paper work
- put the radio on, gear up and put helmet on.
- walk out to bike
- have our bike inspected
- do your show me tell me questions

Meaning the ride itself is only about 30 minutes or so.
It feels a lot shorter though, since you are concentrating so much.

Out of that, you will probably spend a lot of the time pulled over at the side of the road, or waiting for 'safe and suitable' gaps in a roundabout.


SPEAKING of which,don't feel pressured in to taking small gaps in roundabouts, and do NOT 'trust the indicator'.
 

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clutchless downshifts arent a good idea with a pillion on :p and you have to be so much smoother with it :p
 

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1 way Comms.
It's more like a Satnav. In fact, that's how I was told to think of the examiner. Ignore him completely, just treat him like your satnav.
 
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